A critical analysis of edgar allan poes the cask of amontillado

The whole plot deals with the inebriation and, ultimately, the live burial of the antagonist, Fortunato.

A critical analysis of edgar allan poes the cask of amontillado

A critical analysis of edgar allan poes the cask of amontillado

You can read the story here. The story is narrated by the murderer, Montresor, who takes revenge on a fellow Italian nobleman, Fortunato, during the carnival season. When they arrive down in the catacombs, Montresor chains his drunken rival to the wall and then proceeds to wall him up inside the family vault, burying the man alive.

Fortunato at first believes it to be a jest, but then realises that he has been left here to die.

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Fifty years later, Montresor says that the body of Fortunato is still there in the vault. Why does Montresor want revenge on Fortunato? For Montresor has every reason to confide to us — via his close friend, the addressee of his narrative, who is our stand-in in the story — his reason for wishing to kill Fortunato.

But instead of getting a clear motive from him, we are instead given a series of possible reasons, none of which quite rings true. This is made clear in the opening words of the story: The thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as I best could, but when he ventured upon insult I vowed revenge.

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You, who so well know the nature of my soul, will not suppose, however, that gave utterance to a threat. At length I would be avenged; this was a point definitely, settled — but the very definitiveness with which it was resolved precluded the idea of risk.

I must not only punish but punish with impunity. A wrong is unredressed when retribution overtakes its redresser. It is equally unredressed when the avenger fails to make himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong.

This provides a key clue to the motivation — shaky and vague as it is — of Montresor. His revenge is not motivated primarily by any tangible harm that Fortunato has done him, so much as a sense of resentment, a way Fortunato has of making Montresor feel inferior.

Scott Fitzgerald, author of The Great Gatsbyput it: Another clue comes when Montresor fails to interpret a gesture made by Fortunato: He laughed and threw the bottle upwards with a gesticulation I did not understand. I looked at him in surprise. He repeated the movement — a grotesque one.

Poe makes his point by some subterranean wordplay on mason:To wrap it up, Edgar Allan Poe's short story 'The Cask of Amontillado' is the story of a man named Montresor who decides to seek revenge against a man named Fortunato, who has insulted him.

He. Edgar Allan Poe's classic short story, "The Cask of Amontillado," is loaded with irony, and there are several excellent examples of verbal irony to be found. My favorite comes when Fortunato, who. Disclaimer: This work has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional academic writers.

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The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe. Home / Literature / The Cask of Amontillado / The Cask of Amontillado Analysis Literary Devices in The Cask of Amontillado.

Death of Edgar Allan Poe - Wikipedia

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory. Everything takes on symbolic meaning in “The Cask.” Every detail seems to stand for something else, or to be flashing an encoded, and no. Jun 13,  · Herein lies a detailed analysis of Edgar Allen Poe's famous short story "The Cask of Amontillado." This story of a vengeful murder is still popular today, even years after it was schwenkreis.coms: Essay on Edgar Allen Poe's The Cask of Amontillado - Edgar Allen Poe's The Cask of Amontillado Edgar Allen Poe's brings us a twisted tale of vengeance and horror in "The Cask of Amontillado." Poe's character, Montresor, acts as our guide and narrator through this story.

Death of Edgar Allan Poe - Wikipedia